Nway Launches a Winter Olympics NFT-Based Game

Nway, a games developer, has released a non-fungible token (NFT) party game based on Beijing’s upcoming Winter Olympic Games. The launch came just hours after the International Olympic Committee and game developer nWay announced their collaboration.

It is a play-to-earn multiplayer game with the official title of ‘Olympic Games Jam: Beijing 2022.’ It was developed in collaboration with the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

To earn Olympic NFT digital pins, players must compete in a series of winter sports events. In games like Snowboard Cross, Slopestyle, and Skeleton, players will be able to customise their avatars.

The game is available for Android and iOS devices, and it was released on Friday, February 4th, one day before the Opening Ceremony.

“The Olympic Games are the world’s largest sporting event,” Taehoon Kim, CEO of Nway, said. So we can’t think of a better genre than party games to get people of all gaming abilities involved in this massive global celebration.

“Nway has a track record of creating high-quality multiplayer games, and making Olympic Games Jam: Beijing 2022 a play-to-earn title is going to let gamers and NFT collectors alike to not only engage with the Olympic Games but also own a piece of Olympic history.” 

According to the developer, there are three ways to obtain Olympic NFT digital pins: first, by participating in the game’s arcade-style events; second, by purchasing randomised packs on Nway’s website; and third, by purchasing pins directly from other collectors on the Nway marketplace.

The NFT market has grown significantly in recent years, aided by the entry of several high-profile individuals and organisations. For example, Floyd Mayweather, Arsenal Football Club, Nintendo, and GameStop have all stated, or are expected to state, that they will participate in NFT trading.

Unlike other forms of cryptocurrency, an NFT is non-transferable and unique to its owner. The NFT market was valued at $41 billion in 2021, according to the Financial Times.

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Shambhavi Soni